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Welcome to the memorial page for

Allan Johnson

March 8, 1937 ~ December 14, 2012 (age 75)

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SERVICES

Cemetery

Calvary Cemetery
Steger Rd
Western Steger, IL 60475

Visitation
Tuesday
December 18, 2012

2:00 PM to 9:00 PM
Hirsch West End Chapel
3501 W. Lincoln Highway
Matteson, IL 60443

Service
Wednesday
December 19, 2012

10:00 AM to TBD
St. Agnes Church
1501 Chicago Road
Chicago Heights, IL 60411


Allan Edward Johnson, of Matteson, Illinois died Friday, December 14, 2012 at home after battling many health issues.
Born in Harvey, Illinois, March 8, 1937, to Floyd and Anne Jessie Johnson, Allan lived in the south suburban area all of his life. He had one brother, Floyd (Bud). Allan’s adult life began by serving in the United States Army for two years. He went on to college and earned his Bachelor of Science Degree in Civil Engineering from Illinois Institute of Technology in 1970. While in college, Allan worked for the Illinois Department of Transportation as an engineering technician. After graduation, he worked for Greeley and Hansen, for two years in which he worked on a water main project connecting the community of Olympia Fields to the Metropolitan Water Reclamation District. His career continued on to work at Edmund M. Burke Engineering. It was 1972 when he moved to Matteson. Shortly thereafter he met his wife, Margaret on a blind date. They were married for 36 years at the time of his death. They have three children Mandy, Kim and Doug and one granddaughter, Amber. Allan ended his career as a district engineer for Thorn Creek Sanitary District. He worked there 16 years before his retirement in 2002.
Allan was involved with many community services throughout the years including Matteson Planning Commission, Matteson Appointed Village Trustee, Matteson Elected Village Trustee, Apple-Oak Homeowners Association, PADS volunteer, St. Lawrence O’Toole member and St. Agnes Parish member.
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